Fast food ain’t so fast anymore.

If you’re like me, you don’t eat fast food very often. You understand how important it is to eat healthy foods and you try to stick to a nutritious diet. But let’s face it, every once in a while – like when you’ve had a very busy day and just don’t have time to cook a meal – you give in to the urge. When eaten in moderation, fast food probably isn’t going to kill you.

But at the rate things are going, they may have to start calling it “food” instead of “fast food.” A recent report conducted by Insula Research for QSR Magazine, a fast-food industry trade publication, reveals that the amount of time customers wait in line at the drive-through window at fast food joints has increased by an average of 8.19 seconds over the past year.

The study included these restaurants: Burger King, Chick-fil-A, Krystal, McDonald’s, Taco Bell, Taco John’s and Wendy’s. Wendy’s was the only chain to improve on its average service time over last year, while Chick-fil-A and Burger King were rated the most and least accurate, respectively, when it came to filling orders properly.

The slowdown is being attributed to the increased complexity of fast food restaurant menu items. For example, the burritos and bowls in Taco Bell’s new Cantina Bell menu have up to 10 ingredients.

Of course, those of us who know how important it is to store food for an emergency aren’t going to be thinking about fast food. As you may know, I’ve developed a new line of emergency survival food called Food4Patriots (www.Food4Patriots.com). We use a “low heat dehydration” technique for our food so that the flavor and nutrition stays locked in, yet it lasts every bit as long as freeze-drying without costing an arm and a leg.

Packaging is also very important when shopping for off-the-shelf emergency food. It’s vital to keep air and moisture out, and to have a durable package that can take a few bumps over the years without bursting. Look for sealed Mylar pouches with less than 2 percent oxygen content rather than cans or buckets.

Whether you build your own food stockpile or purchase a ready made solution, the bottom-line is that just believing that storing food and water for a crisis is a good idea isn’t enough – you actually have to do it. And when you do, make sure that it’s stored in a manner that will ensure its value and longevity. Then and only then can you rest easy, knowing that you’ve done what you could to be prepared for whatever comes our way.

Does it seem to you that fast food service has slowed down? And what about accuracy? Do you often get the wrong food when you go through a drive-through? Let me know about one of your most interesting fast food experiences.       

 

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