6 Items to Keep in Your Car Trunk

You know that TV commercial where they ask, “What’s in your wallet?” Well, I don’t care about that, but I do want to know what’s in your car trunk. You probably have a spare tire and a jack in your trunk, as well as a window brush and scraper.

And if you’re like me, you have a bag of old clothes in there that you keep meaning to take to Goodwill. And you might also have a few fast food wrappers that you hastily tossed into your trunk after you realized you’d have to give somebody a ride somewhere.

Most of us have assembled stockpiles of food and water, plus other essential items in our homes. A number of us also have bug-out bags loaded with things we’ll need, located near the front door so we can bug out quickly if we need to.

A small percentage of us also have a back-up supply of emergency items at a secondary location, just in case a disaster results in the destruction of our home or we are away from home when a crisis strikes and can’t get back.

But what if you are in your vehicle or at work when a crisis happens and you can’t get home or to your secondary location? Your car or place of business just might be your home for the next 24 to 72 hours until things return to normal.

That’s why it is essential that you keep a three-day supply of items in your vehicle at all times. They could save your life someday. It’s like a traveling bug-out bag – it will go wherever you go and be available when you need it most.

Here are six items I suggest you keep in this bag or in your trunk:

  • Water. Three gallons of clean drinking water should be enough. Also include some smaller, empty water bottles you can fill up and drink out of.
  • Non-perishable food. You could survive without food for three days, but during a crisis your body will need strength. Pack high-calorie items.
  • First-aid kit. Include bandages, anti-bacterial wipes, burn salve, wound-closure strips, aspirin or ibuprofen, lip balm, and any meds you take regularly.
  • Clothing. Pack for a three-day trip, with socks and underwear, pants and shirts, sweaters, windbreaker, coat, gloves, hat and hiking boots.
  • Outdoor kit. Just in case you’re forced outdoors, include fire-starters, paracord, flashlight, hunting knife, tent, poncho, compass and duct tape.
  • Filled gas can. A crisis might mean more driving than you were anticipating. Running out of gas could be deadly, so be prepared.

Finally, make sure your bag is large enough and sturdy enough to hold everything except the large water containers and gas can, but light enough to carry. Don’t wait any longer to put this car kit together.


Like what you read? There’s more where that came from. See how your stockpile stacks up… Click here!


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